Choosing the right prostate cancer treatment

It's normal to feel anxious and overwhelmed after receiving a prostate cancer diagnosis. You're suddenly facing some unexpected choices and an unknown outcome. And you're certain to have a lot of questions.

"The first thing to do is take a step back and gather all the information," says Radiation Oncologist David Fryefield. "You don't need to have surgery tomorrow. You don't need to start radiation tomorrow. You need to find out what your options are and choose the one that's going to be best for you."

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By David C. Fryefield, MD


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Posted May 26, 2015

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Making the most of your patient portal

In a world where so much information is at your fingertips, it makes sense that your medical information should be, too. That's why Willamette Valley Cancer Institute provides you instant access to your treatment history, including diagnosis, medications and lab results through a secure patient portal.

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By WVCI


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Posted May 14, 2015

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Support groups offer benefits to patients and caregivers

When you or a loved one is going through cancer, it's hard to know where to turn for support. For many reasons, it can be uncomfortable to talk with loved ones about what you're going through.

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By WVCI


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Posted May 6, 2015

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Quest for quality cancer care leads to Eugene

Lynn Samuels is on what she calls a "medical safari."

She and her husband, Loren, are temporary transplants in Eugene. They came here following an extensive search for the specialized care Lynn needed, which they found at Willamette Valley Cancer Institute and Research Center, under the care of Dr. Jeff Sharman and Dr. Haidy Lee.

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By WVCI


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Posted April 20, 2015

“Jolie Effect” continuing to raise awareness

No matter what you think of Angelina Jolie Pitt, when she talks, people listen.

That's certainly been the case since 2013 when the actress revealed in The New York Times that she is a carrier of the BRCA1 gene mutation, which fueled her decision to have a preventative double mastectomy.

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by WVCI


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Posted April 7, 2015